Sculpture by the Sea

Australia’s largest outdoor show for sculpture has been going on since 1996. Bondi Beach’s Sculpture by the Sea is an amazing gathering of artists from around the country to participate in this long upheld tradition. More companion exhibitions have been sprouting up ever since the popularization of this coastline exhibit. One at Cottesloe Beach and another at Aarhus in Denmark are complementing the movement started by  Sculpture by the Sea.

Sculpture by The Sea

The large-scale exhibition is an annual event always held during the hot summer months. The event started out as a brainchild of David Handley. Handley saw that there was an outdoor park in Klatovy, Bohemia and he wanted to bring that kind of event to the artists of Australia as well. He was inspired to start a yearly ritual of exhibiting artworks from various parts of Australia so that the whole country could also bask in its own aesthetic evolution and culture. The entire long-haul exhibit spans from Bronte Beach to Tamatama Beach to Bondi Beach. The two kilometer long coastal sculpture exhibition draws in crowds up to half a million people in number. The hundreds of participating sculptors create larger-than life visual attractions for the tourists and locals to view alongside the magnificent seascape scenery of Bondi Beach.

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About the CAD Frontier of Sculpture

Computer aided design has been around for decades now. With the emergence of platforms like AutoCAD, Maya, Solidworks and the rest, 3D modelling has reached new heights in today’s modern communities. We’d like to wonder about the future of sculpture with regards to these fat paced developments. Surely there are quite a number of digital sculptors already at this point. The jewelry industry has already made CAD and CAM (Computer aided machiniery) an integral process of their manufacturing line. Will art also lean towards the digital frontier?

When speaking of sculpture CAM, the degree of difficulty and cost for production are currently much higher than those counterparts that rival painting and photography. Photoshop for example, is easily obtainable, and printing options are plentiful. Lithography is also a high class media that digital 2D artists can use. The problem with replicating 3D models is that CAM technology is very limited to those with more abundant resources. one machine from Solidscape or ZCorporation (3D Printers) can fetch up to over 25,000 US dollars, and not every artist can afford to shell out that kind of money. Likewise, another obstacle is the fact that these 3D printers can only ‘print’ using wax or composite plastics. Many of these media aren’t traditionally used as materials for fine sculpture. The bright side for them is that with the emergence of contemporary sculpture, media selection has broadened and plastics are now sometimes involved with different styles of hybrid sculpture.

The future of the three dimensional art world is soon approaching our doorstep, and when it does, we’ll have a lot more interesting stories to tell about the progressions and novelty discoveries that arise from man’s growing desire to improve. We here at Artsculptor just hope that the development of these capabilities will not hinder our true definition of art. Art is a human rebellion against the mass-produced. It is an original expression of one’s own self that should not be categorized with routine and robotized products.

Mark di Suvero’s Geometric Metal Sculptures

As an abstract expressionist sculptor, Mark di Suvero creates his bold, contemporary pieces in a diversity of rigid and curving shapes. Taking inspiration from prime contours and basic elements, he uses heavy metal and steal beams to create arcs, bends and complex shapes that constitute the foundation for much of his art portfolio. Aside from this, another trait that defines Mark’s artworks, are the fact that many pieces within are kinetic. Swivels and rotatable objects are a common find in his designs, giving them a great capability for motion and interactivity. Mark studied at several universities, such as Berkeley, and the Santa Barbara University in California. He was also a recipient of the (year 2000) International Sculpture Center Lifetime Achievement Award.

As an avid member of the art community, Mark also founded two galleries; Park Place and SoHo Contemporary Art. Aside from these establishments, his three studios in Long Island, Petaluma, and France are all reputable facilities that work round’ the clock to create his bold gigantic masterpieces. Mark’s aesthetic tendency to make use of large elements like railroad tracks and heavy I-beams makes it difficult to construct art at a normal backyard studio, so he uses these three professional studios at their locations to make his metal creations from start to finish. Recently, he published a book entitled Dreambook which is a compilation of sculptures, ideas and poems. It is highlighted with vibrant colors that reflect on his personal taste.

Handmade Art V.S. Technical Production

We all know that factories and machinery have the capacity to produce perfect grade objects with flawless surfaces, spotless coats and pinpoint proportion. We are also aware that human beings are not robots, nor are they precise, routinized assembly lines. What happens then when we pit man against machine in the world of art?

Sculpture in Versailles Area

When you buy an artwork, do you look for every blemish, every tiny irregularity that somehow looks as if it shouldn’t be there? If so, then maybe you’re looking in the wrong direction. Fine decor fits the description on the flawless collection piece, but art for many people is able to transcend this scrutiny of physical quality. Art is humanistic in nature, and is on a caliber of thought and emotion unknown to mass produced works. It really all boils down to what you’re looking for; beautiful objects or beautiful stories. Every work of art is exactly a personal story; a piece of a person’s life and time. Art survives and thrives even through the industrial and digital ages because of its organic and narrative nature. It does not need to be a porcelain doll every single time, because it ought to reflect on the presence of humanity in the world. Art creates a perfect story within every imperfect shape it possesses.

Beginning Art Appreciation for Children

Many people always say that the mind of a child is like a sponge. It’s very absorbent of any strong information because at this stage, it is crucial for the brain to gain new cognitive function so as to further human development. The recognition of art is no exception. What catches a young person’s senses first is usually subconsciously registered as one of the primary traits of dominance. Bright colors, deep contrasts, large masses of form & striking patterns- these are some of the elements that visual artists can utilize to capture the attention of the younger generations.

This type of advice can be very easily related to painting, but when you apply it to the artform of sculpture, what aspects other than physical size can one notice? Well, balance is definitely something to consider, have you ever seen a sculpture that looks like its free standing off a pin-sized point? Or an artpiece that looks so dense in its material, but is stationed to look as if it’s flying?

Imagine the kind of sight that would bewilder you to the point of asking the question: how did he do that? Or how is that possible? Younger people are drawn to things that are both striking in theme and unexplainable in existence. It’s not a mystery to know what to make, it’s a mystery itself that you have to create. Mysteries draw attention.

An Artist or An Art Company

Sculptors throughout the ages have long since aspired for an artistic status that rivals the great museum-status of the renaissance masters, but what happened to these groups of artists that dared to dream a different direction?

Sculptors throughout the ages have long since aspired for an artistic status that rivals the great museum-status of the renaissance masters, but what happened to these groups of artists that dared to dream a different direction?

Let’s take a look at a case study:

The lladro brothers were tile makers in Valencia, Spain when they began their artistic career as young boys. Two of them were painters and one was a sculptor. With a borrowed capital, they bought a kiln for their small home and started honing their artistic skills in porcelain. Today, the Lladro brothers are the leading company in the industry of fine porcelain, boasting a large porcelain-making city of artists and craftsmen. After acquiring majority stocks in jewelry company, Carrera y Carrera, their company encountered exponential growth in the market share.

Despite a small setback in their attempt to launch a leather products brand, Lladro made its way through every artistic trend that came and went. These days they’re moving into contemporary abstract as a theme for their porcelain masterpieces. With the help of artists like Jaime Hayon, Lladro launched several modern collections like Re-Cyclos (recycled porcelain into abstract creations).

Today, Lladro stands as an inspiration for emerging artists to consider a different path that may sometimes deviate from the stereotypical artist’s mindset, but still allows for the growth of personal style and development.

The Metal Sculptures of Jack Anderson

Jack Anderson sculpted giants. His passion for huge sculptures made of metal brought his artistic career to great heights. If you’ve been to the Ironworld Discovery Center near Chisholm, Minnesota, you may come across the Ironman statue that stands 11 meters tall as a figure alone. The entire work is 25 meters into the sky (This is not the Ironman from Marvel Comics mind you, he’s a lot smaller.)

 

Ironman Sculpture

Many of Anderson’s sculptures  reflected on a type of realism that was  fairly popular for creating commissioned works of famous personalities. They did have a sort of mannerist style to them in the sense of facial structure and anatomical perspective. One of his famous clients was the well known Bishop Frederic Baraga, whom Anderson sculpted a shrine for. Entitled the “Snowshow Priest” in the late 1960’s as a religious monument. The statue eventually stood over ten meters tall and was made out of brass. Baraga was depicted holding a seven-foot cross in his right hand and an 8 meter long pair of snowshoes in his left hand.

Anderson’s many sculptural masterpieces still exist on display today as monuments to remember the lives and influences of his patrons. because of the high durability and lasting strength of his materials, aging did not destroy much of his hard effort. He died on December 5th 1993 in Chassel Michigan, however his legacy stands tall on the shoulders of his metal giants and the memory of his artistic talents.