The Ethereal Sculptures of Kylo Chua

When people think about the elegance of fine artworks, they usually picture an ambience of physical flow- a structure that does not collapse upon itself throughout the entire direction of its composition. Many believe that this can be likened to the melodies we listen to in song, or perhaps the sheer continuous tone of spoken word when woven into masterful poetry.

 

Kylo Chua Sculpture

 

One such artisan from the Philippines has captured our attention for his seamless, liquid-like creations that still convey a representational beauty of the feminine figure. Kylo Chua is a Chinese-Filipino sculptor and jewelry artist, who wonderfully touches on the elusive world of fairies and fantasy, through his modern renditions of classical Art Nouveau motifs. Such strides in the directive of his work, span introspective exhibitions in Nagoya (Japan), Alberta (Canada), Singapore and The Philippines Islands.

 

Sculpture Art Jewelry by Kylo Chua

 

His mediums of choice always reflect the physical and tactile grace of his subjects, draping their convoluting anatomies in purist mixtures of fine 18 karat gold, or impeccable shades of glossy whites. Both his full-scale sculptures and miniature jewelry figurines (which he affectionately calls- Thumbeline Sculptures), play with an endless stream of material, alluding to a never-ceasing identity that grows and changes with each passing moment. Such physical elements can be noted from his contouring of elongated arms, legs, and hair strands from the biology of his original subjects, an interesting penchant that brings out the effervescent allure often observed throughout his newer pieces.

Chua is currently one of the most-watched visual artists emerging from Southeast Asia, along with peers Alecia Neo, Sarah Choo Jing, and Melissa Tan. You can chance upon one of his works by visiting the Main Artasia Gallery Branch in Manila, Philippines, or through his online boutique and gallery; www.kylochua.com

The Evolution of Paper in Sculpture Art

Through the last decade, we’ve noticed a crop of emerging personalities in the practice of sculpting with raw paper. Folding, cutting, glue-sticking and rolling- it’s very easy to understand the basics of creating sculptures out of art, however why do we marvel at several of the more recent paper sculptors and their uniquely unbelievable creations?

 

papersculpture

 

Origami is probably one of the best known forms of paper sculpture, followed by paper cut-outs, folding lanterns and silhouettes. In the past few months, we’ve observed artists from every corner of the globe use a combination of the time-tested basic techniques to make artworks that have an impact the first time around. Cutting and folding techniques have evolved,just like the piece of paper art you see above. A modern combination of craft techniques and design styles give way to a new breed of assemblage-art that the world has yet to appreciate in full. We believe 2012 is a year where new and upcoming artists will bedazzle the art world with exciting concepts that will be both bold and innovative.

Sharon Que’s Musically Inspired Sculptures

Ann Arbor’s own Sharon Que is an American hybrid artist. While being a patron of music and specializing in violin restoration and repair, she finds herself creating a number of assemblage sculptures in her spare time. With her musical background in mind, Sharon bridges the gap of media and goes even further with her pieces. She tackles imagery in her work by mixing forms pertaining to issues of spiritual, secular and mathematical relation. The Detroit Institute of Arts acquired and displayed some of her works as well. She’s had various solo exhibitions in Ann Arbor, Birmingham, and recently in Fort Masin Center (San Fransisco) in 2005.

 

Sharon Que and her Public Sculptures

 

Sharon’s deep, yet industrialized compositions speak of her mind’s conversation with the world, addressing her own thoughts as a person facing every issue we all face today in a modern society. Some of her public sculptures blend well in their own hybrid forms due to Sharon’s knack for texture manipulation. Combining smooth surfaces with natural roughs and concrete allows one to fully appreciate the contrast within her artistic works. In 2008 Ann Arbor featured some of her works at the Gallery One in Washtenaw Community College together with some works by Tom Phardel.

Kyveli Makri’s Ceramic Minimalism

Greece has always been a famous hotspot for historical sculpture. Mainly dominated by classical realists in the early days of its aesthetic history, Greece now houses a large number of modern and contemporary sculptors as well. Among these artists, Kyveli Makri aspires to become a top in her field of ceramics and mixed media. Born in Athens, Makri creates hand-built hybrid creations by making use of wood, plexiglass, recycled substances and ceramic materials. Her concepts are characterized by her minimalist usage of design elements, such as simplistic lines and subtle subject contours.

 

Ceramic Sculpture

Her early works can be observed as art that focuses on the conceptual representation of abstract subjects in ceramic media. Preferring block-like subjects such as ocean liners, townscapes and everyday utilities, her minimalistic style of abstract art slowly grew into a wide-eyed understanding of contemporary hybridity. Today, Makri’s works can be found at the Museum of Greek Folk Art and the Interni Interiors Building. They are also sold at the Benaki Museum. Her very latest work can be found at the Acropolis Museum.

Photography by Vassilis Vrettos – Sculpture by Kyveli Makri

The Flaming Lotus Group and the Art of Fire Sculpture.

To some, the famous “Burning Man” Arts Festival is a regular hotspot for gatherings of young and talented artisans from all across the globe. Back in 2000, a female-dominated art group was born through collaborative work during this special festival. The Flaming Lotus Girls took their group’s name from their very first sculptural masterpiece; the Flaming Lotus Sr. The art collective makes use of interactive elements to form kinetic and innovative sculptural pieces that dazzle audiences with displays of light and fire. They’ve gone from using alloys of metal, to medleys of glass and wood to create flame spurts of up to 150 feet in height.

Soma Sculpture

A few years back, they created an original piece called Soma. They were deeply inspired by the ability of neurons to fire signals into a complex system of nodes and receptors. The large-scale sculpture exhibits two neurons that seemingly transfer signals to one another using intense displays of fire and light flow. One of the neurons roots itself onto the ground, while the other is hoisted higher above it. Computers are used to control the LED patterns within the connected neurons. The concept behind the interactivity isn’t limited to automation either. The complex design allows the public to communicate with the sculpture itself via a control system accessible to anyone. A Soma in nature is actually neuron with branches called dendrites and a projection called the axon. Basing from biological science, the art of Soma by this group of artists is a wonderful example of kinetic and contemporary art today.

Soma 2009 by the Flaming Lotus Girls – Photography by Michael Prados

Robert DuGrenier’s Glass Inhabitants

Roberd DuGrenier’s glass artworks are a hybridity of living art. We’ve never seen sculpture used in the curious manner that he creates. His many sculptural forms act as living cells or units by which other organisms can make use of artificially. They are very beautiful for the fact that his glass medium enables onlookers to see what normal people could never see; the hidden process of life in the world.

His hermit crab sculptures are comprised of glass shells that actual live crabs move into. These allow people to see the inner sanctum of the hermit crab’s anatomical body at work within the shell. DuGrenier’s sculptures are a magnificent and interesting way to teach children the basics of biology using these non-harmful curiosities to instruct lesson plans. Another one of his sculptures makes use of an invisible beehive. Sculpted in the natural form and contour of a hive, the artwork interacts with both the bees and people in giving the first a home and the latter a look into nature’s own honey factory. DuGrenier also sculpted a glass element that he integrated with the natural growth of a branching tree, In the globular glass object, people were able to see the movements of the tree’s branch growth day by day. These works of art provide a window into the unreachable sights that human beings often just wonder about.

Sculptures by Robert DuGrenier and Photography by Fvlcrvm

About the CAD Frontier of Sculpture

Computer aided design has been around for decades now. With the emergence of platforms like AutoCAD, Maya, Solidworks and the rest, 3D modelling has reached new heights in today’s modern communities. We’d like to wonder about the future of sculpture with regards to these fat paced developments. Surely there are quite a number of digital sculptors already at this point. The jewelry industry has already made CAD and CAM (Computer aided machiniery) an integral process of their manufacturing line. Will art also lean towards the digital frontier?

When speaking of sculpture CAM, the degree of difficulty and cost for production are currently much higher than those counterparts that rival painting and photography. Photoshop for example, is easily obtainable, and printing options are plentiful. Lithography is also a high class media that digital 2D artists can use. The problem with replicating 3D models is that CAM technology is very limited to those with more abundant resources. one machine from Solidscape or ZCorporation (3D Printers) can fetch up to over 25,000 US dollars, and not every artist can afford to shell out that kind of money. Likewise, another obstacle is the fact that these 3D printers can only ‘print’ using wax or composite plastics. Many of these media aren’t traditionally used as materials for fine sculpture. The bright side for them is that with the emergence of contemporary sculpture, media selection has broadened and plastics are now sometimes involved with different styles of hybrid sculpture.

The future of the three dimensional art world is soon approaching our doorstep, and when it does, we’ll have a lot more interesting stories to tell about the progressions and novelty discoveries that arise from man’s growing desire to improve. We here at Artsculptor just hope that the development of these capabilities will not hinder our true definition of art. Art is a human rebellion against the mass-produced. It is an original expression of one’s own self that should not be categorized with routine and robotized products.

Mark di Suvero’s Geometric Metal Sculptures

As an abstract expressionist sculptor, Mark di Suvero creates his bold, contemporary pieces in a diversity of rigid and curving shapes. Taking inspiration from prime contours and basic elements, he uses heavy metal and steal beams to create arcs, bends and complex shapes that constitute the foundation for much of his art portfolio. Aside from this, another trait that defines Mark’s artworks, are the fact that many pieces within are kinetic. Swivels and rotatable objects are a common find in his designs, giving them a great capability for motion and interactivity. Mark studied at several universities, such as Berkeley, and the Santa Barbara University in California. He was also a recipient of the (year 2000) International Sculpture Center Lifetime Achievement Award.

As an avid member of the art community, Mark also founded two galleries; Park Place and SoHo Contemporary Art. Aside from these establishments, his three studios in Long Island, Petaluma, and France are all reputable facilities that work round’ the clock to create his bold gigantic masterpieces. Mark’s aesthetic tendency to make use of large elements like railroad tracks and heavy I-beams makes it difficult to construct art at a normal backyard studio, so he uses these three professional studios at their locations to make his metal creations from start to finish. Recently, he published a book entitled Dreambook which is a compilation of sculptures, ideas and poems. It is highlighted with vibrant colors that reflect on his personal taste.

Handmade Art V.S. Technical Production

We all know that factories and machinery have the capacity to produce perfect grade objects with flawless surfaces, spotless coats and pinpoint proportion. We are also aware that human beings are not robots, nor are they precise, routinized assembly lines. What happens then when we pit man against machine in the world of art?

Sculpture in Versailles Area

When you buy an artwork, do you look for every blemish, every tiny irregularity that somehow looks as if it shouldn’t be there? If so, then maybe you’re looking in the wrong direction. Fine decor fits the description on the flawless collection piece, but art for many people is able to transcend this scrutiny of physical quality. Art is humanistic in nature, and is on a caliber of thought and emotion unknown to mass produced works. It really all boils down to what you’re looking for; beautiful objects or beautiful stories. Every work of art is exactly a personal story; a piece of a person’s life and time. Art survives and thrives even through the industrial and digital ages because of its organic and narrative nature. It does not need to be a porcelain doll every single time, because it ought to reflect on the presence of humanity in the world. Art creates a perfect story within every imperfect shape it possesses.

An Artist or An Art Company

Sculptors throughout the ages have long since aspired for an artistic status that rivals the great museum-status of the renaissance masters, but what happened to these groups of artists that dared to dream a different direction?

Sculptors throughout the ages have long since aspired for an artistic status that rivals the great museum-status of the renaissance masters, but what happened to these groups of artists that dared to dream a different direction?

Let’s take a look at a case study:

The lladro brothers were tile makers in Valencia, Spain when they began their artistic career as young boys. Two of them were painters and one was a sculptor. With a borrowed capital, they bought a kiln for their small home and started honing their artistic skills in porcelain. Today, the Lladro brothers are the leading company in the industry of fine porcelain, boasting a large porcelain-making city of artists and craftsmen. After acquiring majority stocks in jewelry company, Carrera y Carrera, their company encountered exponential growth in the market share.

Despite a small setback in their attempt to launch a leather products brand, Lladro made its way through every artistic trend that came and went. These days they’re moving into contemporary abstract as a theme for their porcelain masterpieces. With the help of artists like Jaime Hayon, Lladro launched several modern collections like Re-Cyclos (recycled porcelain into abstract creations).

Today, Lladro stands as an inspiration for emerging artists to consider a different path that may sometimes deviate from the stereotypical artist’s mindset, but still allows for the growth of personal style and development.