The Ethereal Sculptures of Kylo Chua

When people think about the elegance of fine artworks, they usually picture an ambience of physical flow- a structure that does not collapse upon itself throughout the entire direction of its composition. Many believe that this can be likened to the melodies we listen to in song, or perhaps the sheer continuous tone of spoken word when woven into masterful poetry.

 

Kylo Chua Sculpture

 

One such artisan from the Philippines has captured our attention for his seamless, liquid-like creations that still convey a representational beauty of the feminine figure. Kylo Chua is a Chinese-Filipino sculptor and jewelry artist, who wonderfully touches on the elusive world of fairies and fantasy, through his modern renditions of classical Art Nouveau motifs. Such strides in the directive of his work, span introspective exhibitions in Nagoya (Japan), Alberta (Canada), Singapore and The Philippines Islands.

 

Sculpture Art Jewelry by Kylo Chua

 

His mediums of choice always reflect the physical and tactile grace of his subjects, draping their convoluting anatomies in purist mixtures of fine 18 karat gold, or impeccable shades of glossy whites. Both his full-scale sculptures and miniature jewelry figurines (which he affectionately calls- Thumbeline Sculptures), play with an endless stream of material, alluding to a never-ceasing identity that grows and changes with each passing moment. Such physical elements can be noted from his contouring of elongated arms, legs, and hair strands from the biology of his original subjects, an interesting penchant that brings out the effervescent allure often observed throughout his newer pieces.

Chua is currently one of the most-watched visual artists emerging from Southeast Asia, along with peers Alecia Neo, Sarah Choo Jing, and Melissa Tan. You can chance upon one of his works by visiting the Main Artasia Gallery Branch in Manila, Philippines, or through his online boutique and gallery; www.kylochua.com

Sharon Que’s Musically Inspired Sculptures

Ann Arbor’s own Sharon Que is an American hybrid artist. While being a patron of music and specializing in violin restoration and repair, she finds herself creating a number of assemblage sculptures in her spare time. With her musical background in mind, Sharon bridges the gap of media and goes even further with her pieces. She tackles imagery in her work by mixing forms pertaining to issues of spiritual, secular and mathematical relation. The Detroit Institute of Arts acquired and displayed some of her works as well. She’s had various solo exhibitions in Ann Arbor, Birmingham, and recently in Fort Masin Center (San Fransisco) in 2005.

 

Sharon Que and her Public Sculptures

 

Sharon’s deep, yet industrialized compositions speak of her mind’s conversation with the world, addressing her own thoughts as a person facing every issue we all face today in a modern society. Some of her public sculptures blend well in their own hybrid forms due to Sharon’s knack for texture manipulation. Combining smooth surfaces with natural roughs and concrete allows one to fully appreciate the contrast within her artistic works. In 2008 Ann Arbor featured some of her works at the Gallery One in Washtenaw Community College together with some works by Tom Phardel.